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20130126
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
've done a lot of hate crimes cases and i know today's bullies are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and i across the country, we have seen too many school districts, quite frankly, that have been slow to respond. and that is why we have to come together like this. that is why we have to get out of our lane and understand that we've
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled completely by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they have been controlling it for over a quarter of a century, to see him get that program up and running and passing it, ramming it through, to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination, is a lesson in what president can do if he not leno's all of the levers to pull but has the will in lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it, to win, is to say over and over again and always saying to myself when i'm doing the research, with hall, look what he is doing here. i try, i don't say i succeeded by try to explain that in my books. it gives a true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. because you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand tim
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
that forecast and the rest of the weekend coming up. >> one of the great soldiers in the civil rights movement have died. the reverend led protests and committed his life to social justice and equality. he was a major figure in the community for four decades. we must give thanks to the reverend for his bravery, honesty, and righteous perseverance. the reverend was 89. >> baltimore county fire units were fighting a three alarm fire in a strip mall. this is on philadelphia boulevard. investigators say the fire appears to have started inside a chinese restaurant. the fire was upgraded to a heard alarm. -- third lot. >> the fire spread fairly rapidly, particularly in a restaurant where they have cooking oils and a lot of combustibles. that necessity as to upgrade the fire fairly quickly. >> the cause of the fire is under investigation. >> a bone marrow drive today to help those in need. the rector of the basilica of assumption in baltimore baltimore was diagnosed with leukemia in 2006. he has one transplant. doctors say that he needs a second transplant. the drive today is to raise awareness that
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
a bad signal to society of repression and limitation of civil rights guaranteed by the constitution of the russian federation. >> several russian cities have already passed similar local laws. the move to legislate on the federal level enjoys popular support. surveys showed 2/3 of the russian public find homosexuality morally unacceptable. the bill has been criticized by human-rights groups, including the kremlin's human rights council. bbc news in moscow. >> stocks rose today as the euro hit an 11-month high. investors took heart that europe's financial crisis may have eased. it is ironic as the situation improves, the real economic situation for many europeans its worst -- gets worse. the british economy shrunk more than expected. the belgian economy is just as bleak. throughout northern and southern europe, the fear is losing your job. >> the fire has been burning for three months fell, who arming the striking workers. they are the latest victims of europe's economic crisis. say goodbye to the sprawling ford factory in eastern belgium. it is shutting down. with europe in recessio
as well and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have c
before it had even started. demonstrators against the bill say are just fighting for civil rights. >> i am liberal. i am for freedom for all. for gay people and other minorities, too. >> this is not about sex in public, but a quick kiss or holding someone's hand -- that's just normal. >> the bill has two more readings. it then goes to the upper house, and president putin for approval. if passed, it could lead to fines for what it calls homosexual propaganda. supporters say the aim is to protect russian children. >> i am going to vote in favor of the bill. god created people of different sexes so that we do not get up to such nonsense. and many russians share his view, but critics of the bill say it will only worsen hostilities that gay people face. gay rights campaigners were attacked earlier this week as they protested against the bill. >> the majority of the russian population is more conservative and rejects homosexuality. critics say the new law would be another step on the path away from freedom and democracy. m a german business confidence has risen to a seven-month high, beating
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
at the forefront of civil rights and at the forefront of lgbt rights. and there is a place in this world where i hope the city would be open to recognizing the contributions of an openly ldbt person. i would hope that that place would be san francisco. one of the things that struck me about this conversation is something that we learn about harvey milk. when he was first elected, he understood the significance of his election. i would like to share with you a part of what he said. it goes, the hope speech often talk about. this is what he said to use his own words: "two days after i was elected i got a phone call and the voice was quite young. it was from al tuna, pennsylvania. the person said things. you have to elected a people so that young child and thousands of people know that there is hope for a better tomorrow." without hope, gays, blacks, seniors, the "ss" give up. without hope life is not worth living. harvey closed, and you and you and you. you have to give them hope. as i think about this, i really think that that is what we are talking about. in this measure. we are talking about
of civil rights, selma, and stonewall, manhattan bossuet's the village where the modern gay rights movement was born. a couple of things happened in congress this week that may have an impact -- will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch mcconnell reaching an agreement on the filibuster. nothing profound. also, they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact president? >> what the house did it is illustrative of what will be ahead of us. they have not gotten over the defeat from november 6. we are going to tie everything to the debt ceiling, this budget crisis. they have no leverage over the president. they discover they have no leverage. now they have to find a way to back down. this is their face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. you will see more of this. the president is in a much stronger position of dealing with the congress and house republicans. >> you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion. but i dissent, the president, like any other, absent a national event where he becomes the dominant central dramatic figure, w
permitted to serve in combat roles and what's next for the u.s. military in term of equal rights and civil rights. the biggest issue is what role the military will have in defending the country at a time when our enemies are fragmented everywhere and it requires very well-educated people and i think the next big thing is in my view is universal service. we're not going to be able to defend the country of ten million people and we're an extremely small force and i don't care what the technology. i believe in universal service. >> a la israel or -- >> oh, yeah. it's going to require some logistical changes and it will require a great deal of leadership, but if you have a situation where you have more people in new york city than you had at pearl harbor and you have an all-volunteer force you're outsourcing our defense for a small number of brave young men and women. that's the next big equal opportunity. >> that's fascinating. kayla, very quickly. you're a published author now and an outspoken advocate. i've got to ask you, political future. are you thinking of running for something, maybe?
in an inaugural address and him linking civil rights and women's rights and gay rights and mentioning the stonewall uprising that gave birth to the gay rights movement was i thought a significant articulation of a vision of where the country is. >> that may be his vision but can he really get there? and particularly with a speech like that. certainly it had to do with being a second term as well. but with a speech like that, which was really sort of an in-your-face speech, how does he get what he wants? >> well, i think it is the obvious question, and i mean one thing you can say is, well, the way he tried in the first term, he does not think was successful. he got some things done obviously. got some big things done with health care. but in the end he wasn't able to get those things done with that style of leadership. so he's going to try something new. i don't know that it will work. gwen: does the speech help or hurt that? >> the speech makes clear he's adopting a different approach. one of the things he said was, we're not going to resolve centuries old debates about the role of g
it was understood as an incredible affirmation of the humanity and civil rights of african americans. >> desegregating the public schools. >> desegregating the public schools, rejecting separate and unequal. but the truth was, it really didn't desegregate the schools even until today. roe v. wade, which was won, the whole idea of women's equality under the constitution was in its infancy. there had been almost no decisions in 1973 recognizing discrimination against women as prohibited by the constitution. roe v. wade comes down, and it's not understood as an affirmation of women's personhood, that we don't lose our human rights when we become pregnant. but almost overnight the public health situation dramatically improved, not only because women had access to legal abortion, but they didn't have to carry to term pregnancies when they weren't healthy. and so it was a dramatic change in the practicality. but what we're still very much fighting is an understanding and a respect for the fact that women, whatever their decisions are during pregnancy, remain full persons under the law. >>
, avery friedman, civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor joins us from miami this week. let's start with the class action lawsuits being filed against the subway restaurant chain. this is an ireport photo of one of the many that turned up around the world and the internet showing subway sandwiches that don't measure up to the company's foot-long claim. subway won't comment on pending legal action but did release this statement -- "for 47 years customer satisfaction has been our top priority. we regret any instance where we did not full fully deliver on our promise to customers." richard, how big a deal is this? >> miguel, does size really matter? does it really matter? does that half an inch or an inch really matter? >> it matters to somebody. attorneys out there. >> to somebody, that's right. >> it seems to matter. that foot-long, all those commercials with the song, well, they're not a foot long. they're 11 inches long or 11 1/2 inches long. it's not like mcdonald's who says, look, i got a quart
is the country's oldest civil rights group joining a lawsuit against the city of new york? we'll tell you, then a little bit later this hour, why some kentucky insiders are warning ashley judd away from a senate run. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ ♪ ♪ tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. as
are allowed, and civil rights attorneys will say that happens, that's allowed all over the country. what bratton did in new york was a much more aggressive form of that. there was -- in heavy crime areas, drug market, open-air drug market areas. you had a very intensive use of stop and frisk. and it had -- there was a -- now, those drug market areas in new york were heavily impacted. now, whether they could have been impacted without stop and frisk is an open question. sociologists say. so, but bratton and other police advocates would say it was instrumental, but, again, that's an open question whether it was, how necessary that was. >> now, how much interaction will bratton have with the community? because at the city council this week, there was heated public testimony for hours with people opposed to having him in the city of oakland and bringing his policies here. how effective can he be if the community doesn't support him? >> it's an interesting question. originally, he was going to be leading the town hall forums where he would be interacting with the community and recognizing the
that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions so you don't get to talk anymor
rights. take for example the civil war when men fled behind so-called enemy lines to the north, they inserted their humanity with the demand they be allowed to join the union army and fight against the confederacy. and black soldiers in world war i came home to find themselves the targets of lynchings and beatings. why? because they were wearing their uniforms in public. but it was the very fact of their service that w.e.b. du bois believed bound them to the citizenship. but with those citizens at home, w.e.b. du bois wrote, this is the country to which we soldiers of democracy return and this is the fatherland for which we fought, but it is our fatherland. it was right for us to fight. the faults of our country are our faults. make way for democracy, and we saved it in france, and by the great jehovah, we will save nit the united states of america or know the reason why. but it wasn't until world war ii that du bois's imperative would become fully realized, because afric african-american like the tuskegee airmen and the first african-american nurses who j n joined the black n
groups and civil rights groups and some scholars is that we put together this omnibus road to electoral reform bill. it's 199 pages long. it has over 50 important changes, and you named some of them all right. and what we're doing is saying as far as we've come already voting still has a little bit more perfection. we can make it better, make it easier, make it friendly to the voters. that's what some people in politics don't want to do, but that's what those of us that are 160 in number, including senator kirsten gillibrand in new york just introduced, and we'll have our work cut out for us to make the election fair and easier for the american citizen. >> john: is this designed to help democratic voters or do both parties try to play dirty tricks with each other's voters? have democrats tried to suppress republican votes as well? >> we're not angels on the democratic side, but i cannot name you one instance to document that. i don't know about it. and look, all republicans are not all bad guys. a lot of these things are being done by their political organizations by a few elected offic
. and a lot of journalists who were too young to cover the civil rights stories of the 60's, they weren't going to miss out on helping to shape history twice. so, they covered him the way they covered him. you know, by slobbering all over him. other historic figure. she could be the first woman president of the united states. this week, after those hearings, the media began slobbering in urgent. it will continue ratchet up when she announces she is running as president of the united states. you know what, bill? you it doesn't matter what you think about this. it doesn't matter what i think about. this it doesn't matter what krauthammer thinks about it. it doesn't matter what brit hume thinks about it. it doesn't matter what anybody thinks about it. because these people, these journalists were born without the embarrassment. nothing embarrasses them about how they behave. >> do you think that brian williams and and the rest of them, diane sawyer, martha raddatz, do you think that they know how they sounded while introducing a very important story, secretary of state's testimony in front
men, women marrying women, they're entitled to the same exact rights, all the civil rights and liberties. >> that caused heartburn in the west wing. >> even the so-called discussion about you know, my saying i was comfortable with gay and lesbians and relationships, i knew his position. >> but you got out in front of him on it, and that is -- that can be a problem. >> i can tell you how i responded. i walked into the office. he got up, smiled, gave me a big hug, said tell you what, man, you say what is on your mind. >> you said it caused a bit of a problem here? >> it did, but not with him, not with him. >> lately joe biden has become the white house closer, cutting the deal on the fiscal cliff and trying to get one on guns. >> are you the only one who can cut deals with republicans now. >> no, no, look, first of all the only reason i would be able to close a deal is because everybody knows i speak for the president. i have his complete support for what i'm saying because i know what he wants, number one, number two, you know i think the reason we make a good team. tip o'ne
but -- . >> look at all the changes people said could not happen. civil rights, women's rights, don't ask/don't tell -- sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> let us come together through a cross this nation to re- instate the assault weapon's ban. ban. [ applause ] >> reporter: they required background checks for all gun sales and clips. after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, eleanor holmes norton said the onus is on ordinary citizens to get involved. >> no more meaning. -- moaning. it's time to do something about it. >> in the crowd, some people did not agree with all gun checks. >> this will not work. >> reporter: what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys committing the crimes. >> reporter: a minister askedd crowd to pray in the direction of the white house for success of the obama administration's efforts to -- administration's efforts to control guns. arne duncan reminded participants it's going to take more than prayer. >> we'll do everything to make sure we pass legislationha makes our children, our families and
civil rights leader who is committed her life to extending the promise of our nation's founding principles to all americans. mrs. everies will lead us in the invocation. [cheering and applause] america, we are here, our nation's capitol, on this day january 21st, 2013. the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama. we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces, blessings upon all who contribute to the sense of the american spirit, the american dream. the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, woman kind, allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the world of belief, this is my country, let us act point meanings that everyone is included. may the inherit dignity and inailble rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these floorish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and fifty years af
for economic drought, and to continue his commitment on civil rights issueses like lgbt rights to take on tasks that require bipartisan support like day to talk about immigration reform and he'll take his case on the road next week in las vegas and to force the hand of congress which he fears will not act on his priorities, president obama will spend much of this coming year taking his case campaign style directly to the people. for "cbs this morning" saturday bill plante at the white house. >>> let's take a closer look now at how the president is pressing ahead with his new agenda and how republicans are already reorganizing for the next election. jeff bellamy is with us. nice to have you in the studio with us goochld morning. >> good morning. >> there's a short opportunity for the president and there's a lot on his plate, gun control, climate control, and you have the immigration reforms he's put out there. does he risk losing on all fronts if he takes all of them at once? >> not to mention the economy. >> correct. >> the white house knows that constitutional
. when you take away people's civil rights or say no to them you're not with them. if you're in a country club of 100 white men and they start dying off, your base is dead. the republican party, michael is right. he tried to do that when he was the chairman. you have to expand your base. only way to do that is to get out of people's houses, to get out of their bed rooms. to leave them alone. and have basically a society which is fair and equitable. don't forget mitt romney talked about the 47%. that is not the way to go about it. they have to look for it. >> last thing you hear, michael. you and i have had these conversations your relationship with the rnc. republican and out there fighting for what you believe in do you see this as i mean for the first time in awhile maybe a good chance and maybe just the drumming in the election with the president winning re-election. do you think republicans are starting? are you seeing signs that maybe it's hopeful in your opinion they're starting to change some of those stances and things you pushed and fought for? this is a hopeful thing for a repub
. outright chaos at worst. outside of the civil war in syria the main concern right now is north africa. libya, algeria where we had the recent hostage taking and deaths of americans. mali where the french are fighting islamist extremists. according to professor burns, this sort of instability could go on for a very long time. >> it may be we don't see the future map of the middle east. it doesn't reveal itself for another 10 or 20 years. this this is so deeply rooted. >> chaos possibly for many years to come. the one thing we know for sure is that terrorists and extremists love chaos. >> that's true. jonathan, thank you. well, online dating doesn't always work out. the woman who says match.com, matched her with a man who stabbed her 10 times and kicked her in the head. mary k. beckman is her name. she is now suing match.com for $10 million. because she says it fails to warn users that online dating can be dangerous. ha! >> mary k. says she met this man wade wiley on match.com in may of 2010. months after she broke up with him he stabbed her 10 times with a butcher knife. repeatedly sto
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)